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CITY OF SHAWNEE
CITY COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES
March 28, 2016
7:30 P.M.

Michelle Distler - Mayor

Councilmembers Present Staff Present
Councilmember PflummDeputy City Manager Charlesworth
Councilmember NeighborAssistant City Manager Killen
Councilmember JenkinsCity Clerk Powell
Councilmember KemmlingCity Attorney Rainey
Councilmember VaughtFinance Director Rogers
Councilmember MeyerDevelopment Services Dir. Wesselschmidt
Councilmember SandiferPublic Works Director Whitacre
Councilmember KenigPlanning Director Chaffee
Fire Chief Mattox
IT Director Bunting
Police Chief Moser
Management Analyst Schmitz
Communications Manager Ferguson
Sr. Project Engineer Moeller-Krass
Assistant Public Works Director Gard
Deputy Parks and Recreation Dir. Lecuru
(Shawnee City Council Meeting Called to Order at 7:33 p.m.)

A. ROLL CALL

MAYOR DISTLER: Good evening and welcome to tonight's meeting of the Shawnee City Council. I would ask that you please silence your electronic devices at this time. I am Mayor Michelle Distler and I will be chairing this meeting. I will do a roll call at this time. Councilmember Neighbor?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Pflumm?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Jenkins?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Kemmling?

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Vaught?

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Meyer?

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Sandifer?

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Present.

MAYOR DISTLER: Councilmember Kenig?

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Present.

B. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE AND MOMENT OF SILENCE

MAYOR DISTLER: Please stand and join us for the Pledge followed by a moment of silence.

(Pledge of Allegiance and Moment of Silence)

MAYOR DISTLER: Thank you. Before we begin our agenda, I'd like to explain our procedures for public input.

During the meeting I will offer the opportunity for public input. If you would like to speak to the Council at any of those times, please come forward to the microphone. I will ask you to state your name and address for the record, then you may offer your comments. So that members of the audience can hear your comments, I would ask that you speak directly into the microphone. By policy, comments are limited to five minutes and no person may speak more than twice to any one agenda item. After you are finished, please sign the form on the podium to ensure we have an accurate record of your name and address.

I would also like to remind Councilmembers to wait to be recognized before speaking. When you are recognized, be sure to turn on your microphone. Please turn the microphone off when you are done speaking.

In addition, while we won't do a roll call vote on every vote, I will state Councilmembers’ names who vote in minority so that our listening audience will have a clear and accurate record of the vote.

C. CONSENT AGENDA

1. APPROVE MINUTES FROM THE CITY COUNCIL MEETING OF MARCH 8, 2016.
2. REVIEW THE MINUTES FROM THE PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING OF MARCH 7, 2016.
3. CONSIDER ACCEPTANCE OF DEDICATION OF LAND FOR PUBLIC PURPOSES CONTAINED IN FP-07-16-03, FINAL PLAT OF JAYHAWK PLACE, 2ND PLAT, A SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISION, LOCATED IN THE 5900 BLOCK OF MELROSE LANE.
4. CONSIDER THE CONVEYANCE OF A SANITARY SEWER EASEMENTS TO JOHNSON COUNTY WASTEWATER AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF QUIVIRA GLENN PARK, 51ST AND SUMMIT, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF FOREST TRACE 4TH PLAT. MAYOR DISTLER: The next item on the agenda is the Consent Agenda. Does the Council have any items they would like to remove? Mr. Pflumm?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. Could we remove Item 5 and discuss it after?

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay. So, do we have a motion to approve the Consent Agenda without Item Number 5?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay. So, then I guess the next item would be Item Number 5, Consider the Annual Software Maintenance and Lease Renewal Agreement for CityWorks.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Could we get a little explanation on that? I mean, I know I brought up the last one and it was 100,000 or 120,000 and this one, you know, is quite a bit itself. So, I mean, every module that we add to our software program, are we going to have an extra, you know, $60,000 to $100,000 annually? Or do we have a total when we’re done of what we’re going to be spending a year?

MR. BUNTING: Yeah. Good evening. Mel Bunting, IT Director. This particular initiative addresses several facets of our City government. It works with our Shawnee Connect application as the memo articulates. It does the service request and the work order management that our staff does or will perform as it relates to service requests that are submitted. So, what we get in addition to this, this was a project that we launched three years ago approximately. And we went out with a bid. And we had several criteria, quite a lengthy criteria of what we were trying to accomplish. So, this particular application, it’s -- CityWorks is two software modules. It’s AMS and PLL. And AMS is Asset Management System. The PLL is the Permitting Land and Licensing. So, with the AMS piece what we get is our service request management and our work order management. It’s GIS-integrated, so we have the ability to grab features within a map and create service requests on those features. So, in that we have the ability to manage our assets. Stormwater, curb and sidewalk, our mill and overlay program is part of this function. And so we have the ability that we’re not longer tied to specific addresses, but basically X and Y coordinates to create and manage our City. So, that was kind of the request for proposals or requests for qualifications when we went into this endeavor. And City Works was the product that we chose. So, when we -- coming back to your original question, when we look at what we’re getting for this product, we’re getting our service request management, our work order management. We have the ability to manage and create inspections on our assets. Whether it’s in a stormwater, curb and sidewalk or mill and overlay, all those kinds of things that we have to do as a City government to maintain our infrastructure. And so some other things that we’re doing is PLL, Permitting Land and Licensing. That’s going to give us our permits, our codes enforcement. And so there’s other pieces that we’re now tying on to this project or this piece of software. So, in that we’ll have our right-of-way permitting, which we hope to launch in the next 90 days, our codes compliance, which we hope to launch in the next 90 days, our special permitting, parades, alcohol, and fireworks. All these things that we do for permitting will be tied into our CityWorks. Another project that we hope to launch within the next, say six months, is our business licensing and our business licensing renewals. So, we’re hoping to put that application within this. The other piece of it is, is that we also are going to be getting what we call a portal. And so in that the ability for our community to submit for a permit, specifically a good example is our right-of-way permitting. Get online through our portal and make an application for a new business license. Receive renewals on that business licensing through this portal. So, these are some of the things that we put in our RFQ, you know, three years ago what we were trying to do. So, coming back to your original question, there was a lot of pieces in here that this product is going to offer the City. And so it’s not just one particular module of software that we’re getting. Now, to the bigger question, this is part of our Lotus Notes migration. And so this was a, what we call on the IT side, an enterprise application. To get a lot of the enterprise applications that we’ve had predominately in Lotus Notes. And so this is that piece that we’re trying to do. So, it’s going to give us quite a bit of product, if you will, features and benefits for us as a City to help us manage and govern our City.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So, the question on that is each module, when we, you know, when we add something, let’s say we do the development on adding the business license, are we going to have to increase our maintenance or is that maintenance going to cover that also?

MR. BUNTING: Yeah. That particular chart that’s in that letter or memo tries to show that cost over a period of time. And you see in years, I believe three, four and five that begins to level out.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Okay. And then the service requests, you know, I think we noticed when we had some landfill issues that, you know, it didn’t really track, you know, where the people lived or even if they were citizens of Shawnee. If they were a mobile app or something like that. So, is there any way that, and I know we’ve talked about it and supposedly Vicki Charlesworth did some e-mail or something, I don’t know.

MR. BUNTING: Yeah. Well --

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: And I don’t know if -- that should be -- if it’s a database, it should be in the database and, you know.

MR. BUNTING: Okay. So, the way we designed this system, the SeeClickFix side of it, which is the mobile app that you will have on your mobile device, the emphasis was to identify the location of the service request, not so much the homeowner who is submitting the request. If that answers your question.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Well, I don’t think we could identify those in the past of who the homeowner was and even if that person lived in the City of Shawnee. Unless --

MAYOR DISTLER: It’s if they decide to submit anonymously or as themselves. If they submit anonymously, we have no way of knowing who it is.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: I don’t know why we even allow that, I mean --

MAYOR DISTLER: Because some people don’t want their contact information known when they want to complain, like if they’re complaining on their neighbor.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Okay. No problem. Thank you for that explanation.

MR. BUNTING: Thank you. Any other questions?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: I’m good with approving this now. Make a motion to approve it.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Neighbor to approve Consent Agenda Item 5. The motion passes 8-0.]

D. MAYOR'S ITEMS 1. KIDS FOR PEACE DAY PROCLAMATION.

MAYOR DISTLER: The next item on the agenda is D, Mayor’s Items. Tonight I have two items. The first is a special proclamation for Kids for Peace Day. So, will Jill Chalfie and her guests please join me in the front?

(Off Record Talking)

(Children from Lucy’s Kids for Peace spoke to the Governing Body of their service and invited everyone to share in their Peace Pledge.)

(Applause)

MAYOR DISTLER: And now I’ve got a proclamation for you guys.

From the Office of the Mayor in recognition of Lucy’s Kids for Peace. Whereas, Kids for Peace was founded in 2006 in Carlsbad, California by Jill McManigal and Danielle Gram, who believe children have an innate ability to foster peace, and which has now grown to include over 100 interconnected chapters around the globe. Through Kids for Peace projects and programs, youth of all socioeconomic backgrounds are empowered to become part of positive solutions leading to a healthy and harmonious planet. Kids for Peace believes that if everyone follows the Peace Pledge, we would have the kind of kindness, respect, unity and love. By getting the Peace Pledge into our schools, communities, and out to the world, they can create the change, and;

Whereas, in 2012, a Kids for Peace chapter was started here to honor Shawnee toddler Lucy Weber, who lost her life to cancer at 17 months old, and who, throughout her illness, brought out the best in people and taught us much about how to live and how to love; and,

Whereas, Lucy’s Kids for Peace has grown to include over 80 members and is actively engaged in monthly projects chosen by the kids, promoting socially conscious leadership, community service, the arts, environmental stewardship, and global friendship; and

Whereas, Lucy’s Kids for Peace projects have impacted thousands, including children and families in need, the elderly, the homeless, children undergoing cancer treatment and their families, shelter animals, military personnel and veterans, adults with disabilities, foster children, and many others in our homes, schools, communities, and beyond; and,

Now, therefore, I, Michelle Distler, Mayor of the City of Shawnee, Kansas do hereby proclaim June 8, 2016, which would be Lucy’s seventh birthday, as Lucy’s Kids for Peace Day and do hereby applaud Lucy’s Kids for Peace for their commitment to uplifting our world through love, and action, and for sharing the Peace Pledge with our City and beyond.

(Applause)

(Photos were taken)

2. PRESENTATION OF COMMUNITY TRAFFIC SAFETY AWARD FROM AAA.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay. The second item is the presentation of the Community Traffic Safety Award from AAA. And I think Bob Hamilton, the Law Enforcement Liaison for the Kansas Department of Transportation is here tonight to make a presentation to our Police Department. And I believe Sgt. Walsh and his unit are here to accept this award.

MR. HAMILTON: Mayor Distler, City Councilmen, as she said my name is Bob Hamilton. And as the chief from Leawood said when he introduced me I’m not the plumber, so we’ll get that out of the way.

I’m proud to be here tonight. This will be the fifth award in a row that your police department has received. This will be their fourth gold award. And this is a pretty great award because only 22 other agencies across our state are receiving this award this year. And as law enforcement liaisons there’s four of us in the state of Kansas. We travel to each agency and we watch the agencies real close on how they handle themselves, how they work in the communities and different things that they’re doing. And the four of us, we’re all retired law enforcement officers. So, we kind of know what they’re going through.

Some of the things that your police department has done that’s qualified them for this award, they did so by having a community-based traffic safety committee that meets regularly. They received points for having a departmental policy regarding the use of seatbelts. And I thought this was probably a pretty normal thing. But we have a lot of agencies across the state that still do not have a seatbelt law that says they have to wear their seatbelts at all times even though it’s a state statute. In education, they’re recognized this year for their High School Smart Choices Programs and for the Shawnee Citizens Police Academy, for the mock crash scenarios that they put on at the high schools where the fire department and Johnson County Med-Act. For their enforcement work, they are recognized their data-driven approach to crime and traffic safety and for being a founding agency of that program. Their impaired driver deterrence program, Click It or Ticket, which is coming up, aggressive driver and motorcycle enforcement, Operation Impact and teen driver seatbelt enforcement, which we just completed two weeks ago I believe. They were also recognized for their close coordination with the traffic engineering department about speed and signage bonuses. Like I said, the police department is receiving their fourth gold award this year. And since this is their fifth award, their plaque, we put a little gem on it which sets them aside from all the other agencies.

So, at this time I’d like to present Sgt. Walsh, Chief Moser and the Shawnee Traffic Unit their gold award.

(Applause)

MAYOR DISTLER: To reiterate, so this is our fifth gold out of 22? There’s only 22 agencies that have this and this is our fifth time.

MR. HAMILTON: There’s only 22 agencies that received the award. There’s four different phases. The gold award is the second highest. And there’s only been five in the state that have received this award every year and your agency is one of them. So, that’s the reason they got the gem on their plaque.

MAYOR DISTLER: And is this the fifth time we’ve received it though?

MR. HAMILTON: It’s the fifth time you’ve received the award, yes.

MAYOR DISTLER: Yeah. I just want to emphasize that. This is the fifth time that we’ve got the gold award.

MR. HAMILTON: There’s only one other agency in Johnson County that has received that, so I’d be very proud of your police department.

MAYOR DISTLER: We are very proud. Thank you.

(Applause)

E. BUSINESS FROM THE FLOOR

MAYOR DISTLER: The next item on the agenda is Business from the Floor. Is there anyone who has comments on an issue that is not on tonight's agenda? Seeing none, the next is F, Items from the Planning Commission Meeting of March 7, 2016.

F. ITEMS FROM THE PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING OF MARCH 7, 2016 1. CONSIDER SUP-01-16-02, A SPECIAL USE PERMIT FOR JOHNSON COUNTY TREE DISPOSAL SERVICES, A COMMERCIAL TREE LIMB DISPOSAL LANDFILL, LOCATED AT 6403 VISTA DRIVE.

MAYOR DISTLER: Item Number 1 is to Consider SUP-01-16-02, a Special Use Permit for Johnson County Tree Disposal Services, a Commercial Tree Limb Disposal Landfill, located at 6403 Vista Drive.

At their March 7, 2016 meeting, the Planning Commission recommended 6-3 that the Governing Body deny SUP-01-16-02 due to safety and the impact to the public trail system, inappropriate use of the property in relation to neighboring properties, and the safety of the operation at the proposed location.

The Governing Body may accept the recommendation of the Planning Commission with five votes, may override the Planning recommendation with six votes, or may return the item to the Planning Commission for further discussion with five votes.

Planning Director Chaffee is going to make a brief presentation.

MR. CHAFFEE: Good evening. Paul Chaffee, Planning Director. The applicant has requested a Special Use Permit to allow the operation of a commercial tree limb disposal landfill located at 6403 Vista Drive in the agricultural zoning district. The location of this proposed operation is north of Clear Creek on vacant rangeland, and is in the AG zoning district. The proposed operation would be from an access road provided from the north end of Vista Drive cul-de-sac between Ryan Lawn and Tree and Attic Storage. The access drive crosses Clear Creek at the Clear Creek Trail and currently provides access to the northern portion of an adjoining property. A driveway is proposed to be constructed off the existing haul road to the west to the property. The owner of the property to the east provided an access easement across his property just north of the Clear Creek Trail, even though that owner was opposed to the project. The access road had two sets of gates, one at the southern end near the entrance and one at the south end of the Clear Creek Trail. The trail and the bridge crossing Clear Creek were constructed to withstand the weight of trucks hauling topsoil from the property to the north of the trail, and signage has been installed along the trail to alert the public of truck crossing. The applicant indicated he expects there would be between 25 and 100 trucks per week that would access the site.

The movement and burning of tree limbs and brush from an off-site location requires approval of the Fire Marshal as provided in SMC 8.20, when it is determined to be in the public interest. The Fire Department found that it was in the public interest to burn ash trees and Austrian and Scotch pines to provide a means to properly dispose of trees that have been infested by the emerald ash borer or the beetle that has infested certain species of trees. The applicant indicated that he proposed to burn limbs and debris in either burn pits or burn boxes. In either case an air curtain destructor would be required to be used to deflect the smoke from the burning debris back into the pit or burn box to provide additional oxygen and heat. The applicant indicated there would be one employee at the site to monitor deliveries as well as monitor the burning of debris.

Burning could not begin prior to 8:00 a.m., material cannot be added to a burn pile after 3:00 p.m., and the fire needs to be extinguished by 5:00 p.m. Burning is also restricted to periods of specific wind speeds with no burning on orange alert days. The applicant would be required to have a burn permit from the City for each day burning occurs. The applicant would also be required to have permits from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for the air curtain destructor and for air quality issues.

The Planning Commission had a lengthy discussion with the applicant and among themselves regarding the special use permit. There were concerns with the area not being fenced and the ability of the public to access the site. Since a portion of the site is in the flood plain, the type of fencing that could be allowed was discussed and the potential for fencing to capture debris, backing up the free flow of stormwater.

Commissioners also discussed the appropriateness of such a facility adjacent to the public trail and expectations of the public to not have dirt, gravel, et cetera covering the trail from the trucks accessing the site. Commissioners expressed concern that water was not available at the site and would have to be hauled in, and that there were no hydrants available for the Fire Department to use if necessary. Commissioners asked the applicant about his experience in operating such an operation and burning in general. Commissioners discussed adding a condition regarding fencing of the operation for safety purposes and as a means to require cleaning off the Clear Creek Trail of debris from the trucks or others accessing the site.

A motion to recommend approval of the special use permit failed. A motion to deny the request was passed by the Planning Commission. Commission members cited the following reasons from their discussion and consideration; safety and impact of the public to the trail system, inappropriate use of the property in relation to neighboring properties, and the safety of the operation at this location.

The Planning Commission voted 6-3 to recommend the Governing Body deny SUP-01-16-02, a special use permit for Johnson County Tree Disposal Services to operate a commercial tree limb disposal landfill in the Agricultural (AG) zoning district, located at 6403 Vista Drive due to the reasons listed in the staff report.

MAYOR DISTLER: Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Mr. Pflumm?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. I’ve got a couple questions here. First of all, the land to the north, does that butt up to the property that the City just acquired?

MR. CHAFFEE: I believe some of it does.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. And then the next question is the land to the east. I mean, in the past, and there’s been a lot of dump trucks moving in and out of that area right there, is that correct?

MR. CHAFFEE: There has been some top soil removal from that site. And it originally was used and the haul road created when Vista Business Park on the south side of Clear Creek was developed to bring some of that property up out of the landfill. And now occasionally there are some dump trucks that continue to provide some topsoil off the site.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: And those are a lot bigger trucks mostly likely than these tree trucks that are going to be driving back and forth here. So, I just don’t understand how that’s a safety issue there and the dump trucks are not. So, you know, I just don’t know. I guess I just disagree with some of the comments that might have been made there. You know, do we have a special use permit for removing the topsoil and that stuff or --

MR. CHAFFEE: No, there’s none. It’s a prior operation.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Okay. But it’s similar to the one that would basically be abutting to it?

MR. CHAFFEE: Well, I think in this case the number of trucks is significantly higher than the number of trucks that currently access the topsoil operation from my understanding.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: And I would probably agree with that. But I would think that the topsoil trucks are going to be much greater and heavier than the tree trimming trucks, but I don’t know.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Jenkins.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: A couple questions, Paul. Could you point out where the public trail is approximately?

MR. CHAFFEE: The public trail is --

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: That white one.

MR. CHAFFEE: The white one, yes. And then it carries on over further to the east and connects to the Little Mill Creek Trail that goes north and south.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Yeah. The second question I had was, what is the alternative for disposal of these infected limbs now? I mean, what do they do with them?

MR. CHAFFEE: There are a couple alternatives. One is the burning. And there are a couple sites in Johnson County that do that. Actually the preferred method by the environmental folks is to grind them and chip them up. And there are certain requirements as to what the ending up chip size can be. But even chipped and ground can be used as mulch or it can be taken to a landfill or another place to dispose of them.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: But does it have to be treated first or something like that because I don’t know if you can --

MR. CHAFFEE: No, they don’t. Because of the size that it cuts up. And actually in most cases the larvae are already gone. The tree is dead and so the borers leave and find the next tree that they want to eat.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: And I guess an issue that comes to mind is that we have pretty good regulations about what you can do with tree limb disposal in the City of Shawnee. You can’t burn them yourself really.

MR. CHAFFEE: Right.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: And every now and then we get some help from the Public Works guys will accept that kind of debris and take care of it, but not necessarily on a routine basis. If we had an ice storm or something significant like that they’ll set up an operation. I’m just wondering, you know, it would be kind of nice, this, of course, is commercial so I guess I’m not even talking about this so much as I am just the idea of a place people can take their limbs and things and get rid of them. I mean, it would be nice to provide some services. It’s great when you put rules out, but then you have no way for the people to meet the requirements. That’s like kind of those unfunded mandates except this one doesn’t really fit as an unfunded, but it’s an unsupported mandate I guess.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Vaught and then Mr. Sandifer and then Mr. Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: I would just like to touch on something. Councilman Pflumm said, yeah, there is different size in trucks. But if you’re a kid and you get run over by a one-ton truck or a two-ton truck, I think both trucks are probably going to kill you. The idea that, you know, I think we built a trail -- the topsoil operation has been there for many years. We added the trail in. My understanding is that business is coming to an end, so I think we’re going to see far less traffic, or I know that he’s interested in moving his operation. You know, we put a trail there knowing of that risk. But I think adding to the risk is probably not very prudent on our part. You know, I know I believe we got an e-mail from one of the businesses down there. When you look at the number of trucks, I would say that on a normal week you might get X-amount of trucks. But when we have an ice storm you’re going to have trucks lined up in there bumper to bumper from Shawnee Mission Parkway to the entrance of that place. And I think it’s, you know, that’s not an industrial park, that’s a business park. And it might be industrial zoning, but that’s a business park. We have insurance offices down there. We even changed their zoning to allow things like insurance offices. You have Hodgdin’s, you know, million dollar facility down there that they’re going to be driving right in front of that. You have the Johnson County, the Mill Creek Center down there where you have the, I believe the childcare, the nature child care, you know, nature focused childcare. That just doesn’t make sense to me. You know, I do find it interesting because, you know, when we talked about -- when we talk about pool fences, it’s all about safety. But when we’re talking about crossing the trail, safety doesn’t seem to be an issue. And I don’t get that. You can’t have it both ways. You’re either for safety or you aren’t. This is truly a safety issue.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Sandifer.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: You know, I have to agree with Mr. Vaught here also. I believe it’s a quality of life issue also. You know, we’ve spent a lot of money building the park system or the trail system that’s going through there. Now, whether the smoke diverts back into the pit and re-burns, I’ve been around a couple of these businesses doing this. There is still smoke. There is still the odor. You still have the smell. And when you put it in the center of town with all the residents this case, it needs to be something that would go further out. I’m sure there’s other people that have the same type of breathing disorder that my wife has. And my wife couldn’t be around that. You know, if something like that was around our house we’d have to move. You know, so I believe it’s a quality of life issue. And I’m not against that type of business, but I think it needs to be further out and away from the houses. That’s my opinion.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yes. So, some of my comments. First, I read the minutes from the Planning Commission meeting, every single word of them. And a couple of issues have come to mind for me as I feel like there are still steps that need to be taken to mitigate the risk. And as noted in the Planning Commission minutes, the proximity thereto the trail system, so recreational use is by adults and children. The fact that you have school children as well that could, you know, cross into that area,that also presents a risk as well. And then speaking as to the traffic, it was noted in the minutes by Mr. Bichelmeyer that the anticipated truck traffic could be 25 to 100 trucks a week. So, that averages at a high up to 15 per day, which is also significant. It also presents some safety concerns as well, which I don’t think have been completely addressed. And then the lack of a water source nearby. And I know a couple of recommendations have been made and there could be a fire hydrant installed. There could be a couple of others as well. But I feel like that’s a serious enough issue in the event of a hazardous situation, especially on a plot of land of that size that should be addressed, or at least have a likely solution in place prior to approval. So those, I think those are some of the issues and most of those were all noted within the Planning Commission minutes as well.

And reading those I had a few other concerns as well, and Paul may or may not be able to address with. But with the transfer of diseased limbs, is there a possible risk of cross-contamination or contamination through the air? They could blow over and infect other trees and plants as well.

And then one other item before that gets addressed is that there is obviously going to be people that are hired to manage this as well. And I would feel more comfortable knowing that there is a plan in place to hire people that are skilled and they’re going to be trained appropriately and know that’s kind of ironed out prior to approval just because this is a major operation. Paul.

MR. CHAFFEE: Yeah. I can answer the first one probably better than the second one not knowing who the applicant may hire, you know, for that, to sit at the site all the time. But as far as the cross-pollination answer, and we talked with Kansas Department of Agriculture who had some pretty lengthy guidelines regarding how to control the Emerald Ash Borer. And then also Johnson County Parks and Rec because they have the tree farm just not too far away. Both of them, the tree is already dead, so the beetles and the borers are gone from the trees that they’re going to take. If you had an ash tree that you just wanted to dispose of there may be evidence of the larvae. The beetle or the borer isn’t going to take the ride from someone’s house, you know, to the landfill, it’ll fly off and go do its thing somewhere else. But through the grinding or the burning of the limbs the larvae would be destroyed, so they wouldn’t be able to move from this location to another location. Hopefully that answered your question.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: And a follow-up, and you may not be able to answer this either. But is there any reason or speculation why there are so few collection sites in the area so far? Is it mainly due to this is a new phenomenon in terms of this area?

MR. CHAFFEE: I think it’s a relatively new phenomenon. But as I noted in the staff report we’re talking hundreds of thousands, if not millions of ash trees that potentially could be affected. All your ash trees -- or folks can take precautions through injection or through drenching of their ash to hope that the borer just goes ahead and passes them over. I don’t know if it has a nasty taste to them or what it causes. But, you know, I think it’s just starting to reach our area. It’s been in Missouri for a while. Johnson County, Wyandotte County, Douglas County, and then just since we’ve started with this special use permit, Brown County, which is north of Lawrence, they’ve seen active signs. So, you know, this is just a pest that’s working its way across the country.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: And as I understand as well the trees can be treated as well and some residents and homeowners choose to treat the trees --

MR. CHAFFEE: Right.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: -- instead of destroying them. And so that’s also an option.

MR. CHAFFEE: Yes.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Okay. Thank you.

MAYOR DISTLER: As a follow-up to Brandon’s question, kind of a two-part question. And the reason I’m asking is because since you said that, at the last council of mayor’s meetings, and I don’t want to say which city it was because I don’t remember, so I don’t want to mis-speak. But one of the mayors had mentioned that in their parks and public areas they’re proactively removing all of their ash trees. So, they’re not dead. They’re doing it as a preventative. So, if there is -- and then so I don’t mis-speak again, it’s my understanding that none of these trees can be removed from Johnson County or Wyandotte County because we’re in the infected area. So, if they’re moving their live trees that do potentially have it into our city to come burn them -- because obviously there’s a big enough risk, we’re not allowed to remove them out of Johnson County, but we’re going to travel through the City with live trees that could possibly be infected?

MR. CHAFFEE: I believe it’s Prairie Village is the city that’s being very --

MAYOR DISTLER: That’s who I thought, but I didn’t want to mis-speak.

MR. CHAFFEE: Yeah. Their being very proactive.

MAYOR DISTLER: That’s who I thought it was.

MR. CHAFFEE: No. Just the information that I got from Department of Ag and Johnson County Parks and Rec, you know, that that danger is just either not great or number one, we’re already in an area that’s going to be -- that’s infected and, you know, they’re already here type of thing. But you are correct as far as the counties that I mentioned are quarantined where you can’t take --

MAYOR DISTLER: Right.

MR. CHAFFEE: -- ash tree limbs or logs out of those counties like down to Ottawa or something like that.

MAYOR DISTLER: Right. So, I would think that there is some risk then if we’re not really seeing it in Shawnee, then bringing it into Shawnee even though we’re in the quarantined county.

MR. CHAFFEE: And it’s here in Shawnee.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay.

MR. CHAFFEE: We have trees that have been infected.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay. Thank you. Any other comments from the Council? Mr. Kemmling?

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: It seems like every year I get a battle of tree limbs in my yard, so when I first saw this I thought it was a pretty good idea just because I wanted one more way to get rid of my own limbs. And the beginning of the packet sounds favorable. It talks about vacant rangeland, agricultural leased zone, getting rid of these limbs from trees that have disease. And I guess I have a question here, Paul. It says when it’s talking about the burn boxes, it says no smoke is detected. Is that accurate or not accurate?

MR. CHAFFEE: That’s the information that we got from the Johnson County Environmental folks who are the ones who monitor. That the air destructor will suck that smoke in and push it back into the pits or into the boxes. And if I was driving down Shawnee Mission Parkway, according to Mike Booth, I wouldn’t see a plume of smoke or anything coming from the site.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay. Because I mean it sounds good when it says here no smoke is detected.

MR. CHAFFEE: Right.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: But I agree with Mickey. If I was one of those -- if I owned one of the houses just to the -- was it the west of there or the east -- the west of there? I would be kind of ticked if I smelled burning limbs all day. So, that would be worth some investigation because --

MR. CHAFFEE: And it may be more of the odor that you would get from the burning smoke as opposed to seeing the smoke itself.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Right. Not the visible smoke, but the smell.

MR. CHAFFEE: Right. Yeah.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: So, to me that would be a legitimate concern to look at. The fact that they have to get a burn permit every day I like that idea too. But I do also -- I see the concern when we cross that trail. Just I don’t know what it looks like for a truck approaching it on the ground, what the visibility is, but I could see as one is walking, running or biking, yeah, that there is a potential for that. So, I guess as it stands I’m not -- I see the issues and I would have some reservations with it, but I’m not necessarily opposed to the idea of maybe there were some revisions made. So, Paul, if we denied this special use permit and there were some changes made, when could another one be applied for or could it be --

MR. CHAFFEE: The applicant can apply for one immediately.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay.

MR. CHAFFEE: Yeah. Some cities have six-month wait periods, Shawnee does not.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay.

MR. CHAFFEE: If someone wants to come back with a new plan --

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Plan or variation.

MR. CHAFFEE: -- and go through the process they could do that.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay. All right. Thank you.

MAYOR DISTLER: Any further comments from the Council? Mr. Neighbor?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Yeah. I just -- the plan, I see where there is a need. I don’t know that this is the right place because the ash trees are going to -- what comes to mind to any of those you who that have traveled in Colorado and seen what the bark beetle has done out around Silverthorne and all over and down around the number of places. And basically that is the bark beetle. And there’s a second beetle, but those are airborne. And they just -- the tops of the mountains and the trees up above -- almost to the timberline and a lot of places are gone and dead. But below there they’re still alive. But, you know, this is nature at work and it’s going to happen. And we need, you know, somehow to get rid of them. My question is what are you going to do with all the ash if you’re going to burn that many tons of trees. But the way this stands right now I cannot support it, so.

MAYOR DISTLER: Any further discussion from the Council? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item. Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: You want us to move it?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: I move that we accept the recommendation of the Planning Commission to deny SUP-01-16-02.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS NEIGHBOR, JENKINS, KEMMLING, VAUGHT, MEYER, SANDIFER, KENIG: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Nay.

MAYOR DISTLER: And the nay was Mr. Pflumm. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Neighbor and seconded by Councilmember Meyer to accept the recommendation of the Planning Commission to deny SUP-01-16-02. The motion passed 7-1 with Councilmember Pflumm voting nay.] G. STAFF ITEMS 1. CONSIDER APPROVING PRELIMINARY PLANS AND AUTHORIZING ACQUISITION OF EASEMENTS FOR THE NIEMAN ROAD CORRIDOR SOUTH STORM DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT, P.N. 3400, SMAC TC-21-072.

MAYOR DISTLER: The next item on the agenda is Staff Items. Item Number 1 is to Consider Approving Preliminary Plans and Authorizing Acquisition of Easements for the Nieman Road Corridor South Storm Drainage Improvements Project, P.N. 3400, SMAC TC-21-072. This project is on the City's Capital Improvement Program for construction in 2016. On November 9, 2015, the Governing Body awarded a design contract to Olsson Associates, Inc. It now requires preliminary plan approval, authorization to proceed with final plans, and approval to acquire easements. The cost estimate for construction is $4,930,838 and is funded through SMAC funds, the City's Parks and Pipes program, and other special funds.

a) Consider approving the preliminary plans and authorizing Olsson Associates, Inc. to continue with design of final plans.

MAYOR DISTLER: There are four actions to consider. The first is to consider approving the preliminary plans and authorizing Olsson Associates, Inc. to continue with design of final plans.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Mr. Pflumm?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. Just to double-check on the plans, does it include any of the stuff along Nieman Road? I mean, the re-striping or that stuff? Just double-checking. Thanks.

MAYOR DISTLER: Is there anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Jenkins to approve the preliminary plans and authorize Olsson Associates, Inc. to continue with design of final plans. The motion passed 8-0.] b) Consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign Addendum No. 1 to the Professional Services Agreement with Olsson Associates, Inc., in the amount of $93,057.

MAYOR DISTLER: The second action is to consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign Addendum No. 1 to the Professional Services Agreement with Olsson Associates, Inc., in the amount of $93,057.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Mr. Jenkins?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Real quick. Just a comment. I attended the meeting, the Mayor was at the meeting as well, of the public. And it was very well attended. So, I was very pleased to see the people did get out and they got the information, so that should go a long ways in letting the project forward smoothly.

MAYOR DISTLER: I agree. Thank you. Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Jenkins to approve and authorize the Mayor to sign Addendum No. 1 to the Professional Services Agreement with Olsson Associates, Inc., in the amount of $93,057. The motion passed 8-0.]

c) Consider authorizing staff to acquire easements by initially offering tiered flat fees ranging from $400 to $3,500 for temporary construction easements and $800 to $6,000 for permanent drainage easements.

MAYOR DISTLER: The third action is to consider authorizing staff to acquire easements by initially offering tiered flat fees for Temporary Construction Easements and Permanent Drainage Easements in various amounts depending upon size.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Kenig and seconded by Councilmember Pflumm to authorize staff to acquire easements by initially offering tiered flat fees for Temporary Construction Easements and Permanent Drainage Easements in various amounts depending upon size. The motion passed 8-0.]

d) Consider authorizing staff to acquire easements still outstanding as of May 9, 2016 by condemnation. This will require additional Governing Body action on May 9, 2016 to adopt a Resolution and Ordinance to appropriate private property for the use of the City for the purpose of conducting storm drainage improvements.

MAYOR DISTLER: The final action is to consider authorizing staff to acquire easements still outstanding as of May 9, 2016, by condemnation. This will require additional Governing Body action on May 9, 2016, to adopt a Resolution and Ordinance to appropriate private property for the use of the City for the purpose of conducting storm drainage improvements.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Kenig and seconded by Councilmember Pflumm to authorize staff to acquire easements still outstanding as of May 9, 2016 by condemnation. This will require additional Governing Body action on May 9, 2016, to adopt a Resolution and Ordinance to appropriate private property for the use of the City for the purpose of conducting storm drainage improvements. The motion passes 8-0.]
2. CONSIDER AGREEMENTS WITH JOHNSON COUNTY FOR TWO 2016 CARS PROJECTS: QUIVIRA ROAD, FROM 47TH TO 62ND PLACE, P.N. 3410, AND JOHNSON DRIVE, FROM QUIVIRA TO PFLUMM, P.N. 3415.

MAYOR DISTLER: Item Number 2 is to Consider Agreements with Johnson County for Two 2016 Cars Projects: Quivira Road, from 47th to 62nd Place, P.N. 3410, and Johnson Drive, from Quivira to Pflumm, P.N. 3415. Both projects are included on the City's Capital Improvement Plan for construction in 2016. CARS funding has been approved for both projects and includes reimbursement for 50 percent of all construction and construction engineering costs.

a) Consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign an agreement with Johnson County for the public improvement of Quivira Road from 47th Street to 62nd Terrace, P.N. 3410.

MAYOR DISTLER: There are two recommended actions. The first is to consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign an agreement with Johnson County for the public improvement of Quivira Road from 47th Street to 62nd Terrace, P.N. 3410.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Motion to approve.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Move for approval on Item A.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: I second it.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: We can’t do them both at the same time, right?

MAYOR DISTLER: Right. We’re doing the second recommended next. So, at this point we’re just doing P.N. 3410.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Okay. So, it didn’t matter.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Second. Then the second.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Okay.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Sandifer to approve and authorize the Mayor to sign an agreement with Johnson County for the public improvement of Quivira Road from 47th Street to 62nd Terrace, P.N. 3410. The motion passes 8-0.]

b) Consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign an agreement with Johnson County Kansas for the public improvement of Johnson Drive from Quivira Road to Pflumm Road, P.N. 3415.

MAYOR DISTLER: The second recommended action is to consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign an agreement with Johnson County Kansas for the public improvement of Johnson Drive from Quivira Road to Pflumm Road, P.N. 3415.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Move for approval on Item B.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Sandifer to authorize the Mayor to sign an agreement with Johnson County Kansas for the public improvement of Johnson Drive from Quivira Road to Pflumm Road, P.N. 3415. The motion passes 8-0.] 3. CONSIDER FINAL PLANS FOR THE 2016 ROOF REPLACEMENT PROJECTS.

MAYOR DISTLER: Item Number 3 is to Consider Final Plans for the 2016 Roof Replacement Projects. RTI Consultants completes regular roof inspections of all City-owned facilities. They have recommended partial roof replacement of the West Flanders Arbor, Shawnee Town Classroom, also known as the Trail Café, and the Public Works Service Center. Final plans are ready for approval. Replacements are budgeted in the Equipment and Facility Reserve Fund. The recommended action is to consider approving the final plans for the 2016 roof replacement projects and authorizing staff to proceed with bidding.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Mr. Jenkins?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Yeah. I just had some concerns I guess more than questions. Looking at the life of some of these roofs, I would like to think that when we put these roofs on and do the repairs they’d be good for 20 years. We don’t even get 20 years out of them. And that kind of alarms me that we’re not getting much longevity out of the previous roof or the previous roof repairs. And that is concerning. And I’d like to have that examined a little bit. Are we getting ripped off by the people that are doing the work or has it just been really bad weather and this is just an unusual situation? But I mean, we’re putting out a heck of a lot of money on roofs. We went through this last year. We’re coming back this year. $130,000 for one roof. That’s a lot of dough to fix a roof.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: It’s a big building.

MS. GARD: Caitlin Gard, Public Works. I’m not sure if I can speak to the installation of the roofs in the mid-90s. But with our new roof replacements when we go out to bid we will make sure that there is a 20-year kind of warranty system on these roofs.

MAYOR DISTLER: But they were replaced in the mid-90s?

MS. GARD: Yeah. There’s a schedule in your packet on page 61 of the date of the last repair or installation of the roofs.

MAYOR DISTLER: So, then we are getting 20 years out of them?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: No, we’re not.

MS. GARD: Pretty much approximately.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I know one of them we did that West Flanders one. The other ones are under 20 years. Not a lot under, about 19 years on one, 18 years on the other.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: But I would like to think that the 20-year mark is the low end. They’re protecting their, you know, the old CYA, yeah, we’ll give you 20 years. But we’re going beyond -- we can’t even make 20 years, so I’m kind of wondering what’s going on here, guys. You can’t even make 20 years out of these.
MAYOR DISTLER: And is it a type of roofing material? Are they --

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Well, there’s three different types. I have a question.

MAYOR DISTLER: Well, I didn’t know if, I mean, is it a type of material? I guess I should be more specific with my question. Is it a type of material that could expect 20 years out of?

MS. GARD: For the three different roofs that we’re going to bid we’re going to request a 20-year warranty on the roofs.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Right.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: And what exacerbates the issue for me is that the roofs aren’t just going bad, but I mean we’ve got rot and all kinds of stuff. So, it’s more than just that the roof is starting to poop out after 18 or 19 years. We’re not -- obviously it’s been pooped out for more than that because we’ve already got wood rot and have to have full replacements and stuff which I think really increases the cost and we’ve got to tear everything up and put all kinds of new stuff in. We’re not just simply recovering the roof. So, that’s pretty alarming.

MAYOR DISTLER: Right.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I think we need to take a hard look at this.

MAYOR DISTLER: Right. And that’s why I was asking. Because, you know, even on your home roof you can get a cheaper 20-year roof or you can get the presidential 30-year. You can get the ones that are lifetime. So, that’s why I didn’t know if it was specific materials because I didn’t know which kind of roofs if it was option, which is why I was asking. I wasn’t challenging you at all.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I didn’t think you were.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Pflumm.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: But you’re right. I mean, we did get -- can you throw up the pictures, please? I think we did get fairly longevity out of like the shake ones in Old Shawnee Town.

MS. GARD: Specifically the shake roofs, is that what you’re looking for?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: That’s the first one. The one that’s really alarming is the next one, but -- is that the one on the Public Works building or is that --

MS. GARD: No. That’s at the Trail Café. And then we also have the one -- this is the arbor at West Flanders.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. West Flanders that’s the one. I thought it was at Old Shawnee Town. Yeah. So, that one, I mean you got fairly longevity out of that. But if you throw up the Public Works building, I mean, I thought that was a metal roof and that’s -- is that metal?

MS. GARD: Uh-huh.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: That’s a lot longer than a 20-year roof. I mean, that’s like a hundred year roof.

MS. GARD: It also has skylights in it that you really can’t see well in these pictures. They’re outlined.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: But did we look at like, I mean, they’ve got spray coatings that you spray on these --

MS. GARD: They do.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: -- that is a lot more economical.

MS. GARD: Yeah. One of our options when we’re going to go out to bid on that roof out at the shop is, first of all, is to remove the skylights which are causing just a huge issue with leakage. And secondly, we’re going to have an option to bid kind of like an overlay like you’re talking about which would be one of the cheaper options.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: But are you just talking about a not to exceed number here of 130,000, I guess?

MS. GARD: Right. That would be the most expensive option of removing the metal and replacing it rather than an overlay.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. Because that metal is -- you’ve got another hundred years on it probably. Who knows?

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Sandifer and then Mr. Vaught.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: One of the issues I’ve found in doing the spray on some of the buildings and the work that we’ve done is the spray will hold moisture underneath it and the metal will rust out underneath it. I wouldn’t advise the spray. It would be probably worse off on our buildings than what we have. The PVC material is a good material to go for an overlay if we’re trying to go for a cheaper way out.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: I think it depends on what’s underneath.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: But it’s a standing seam roof. You know, it just has metal and insulation underneath it. So, the easiest way to keep a standing seam roof is to replace the standing seam roof. That’s what we’ve found. We’ve put different roofs on some of those and we’ve had to go back and replace them. That’s what we’ve found.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Vaught.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Kind of putting the cart before the horse. We don’t have any bids yet. There’s no such thing as a hundred-year roof, Dan. Metal does rust. And in a standing seam roof you’re about 25, 30 years. Metal is -- it’s going to deteriorate. Silicone coatings is what the popular thing is now. But obviously none of us are roofing experts and that’s why we hire experts to do this. When you look -- I will say the shelter you’re going to have shorter life span on the shelter because it’s an open area. You’re going to have moisture underneath versus a house where you’re conditioning there underneath that roof and, you know, you’re just open, so you’re absorbing moisture from underneath that shelter all summer long. You’re exposed to the elements. And when we do talk about 20-year roofs, 25-year roofs, 20 years ago there wasn’t a whole lot of 20-year commercial roofs. I mean, I think there is now. But 20 years ago you’re kind of -- there is still a lot of -- the last five, six, seven years there’s been huge advances in product development in roofs. But I know 20 years ago in roofs, and we all deal with them in commercial real estate is they’re just -- the product wasn’t there and you saw a lot of built-up roofs and a lot of tar roofs. And I mean it’s, you know, those products are going away and you’re seeing silicone and various things that stand up to UV rays. But I’m just kind of interested in seeing what the bids are. I mean, let’s see where these people come in at and what their recommendations are and go from there.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Kenig and then Mr. Pflumm.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yes. So, when I was looking over this I didn’t see in here the firms that we’ve contracted with in the past whether or not it’s, you know, we’ve tended to use one firm or it’s, you know, really just been about the bid process and whoever comes in at the lowest. But when we send this out to bid these next set of projects, and maybe this is mentioned on a new one, but don’t know this, but can it be included if it’s a firm we’ve worked with in the past and which projects or which roofs they’ve replaced for us in the past so we have that context?

MS. GARD: Absolutely. I can include that.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Because that would also help when looking at this to know if there has been an issue with prior roofs we can look at that and know kind of what the trends are.

MS. GARD: Absolutely.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Okay. Thank you.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Pflumm and then Mr. Jenkins.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Go ahead.

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay. Mr. Jenkins.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I guess too many people have theirs on, I can’t turn it on. Okay. There we go. I was just wondering about the inspection schedule. Do we only look at certain buildings each year or is there a widespread roofing inspection process, and then we identify through that process the ones that are bad? Because I’m wondering, it seems like some of these roofs got in pretty bad shape before we’ve said anything and that may be a lot more expensive to fix them if they’re, you know, if we catch them earlier that might be a lot less expensive ordeal.

MS. GARD: Yep. It’s actually the latter. Every year we inspect every roof. Our consultant RTI does that. We have a contract with them. We didn’t start inspecting roofs annually until about four or five years ago so that’s kind of why we’re at right now. Before five years ago it was the responsibility of the facility manager, so they would just do minor repairs in-house, and if needed, they would contract out the larger items. But these large items. But these large roof replacements that are coming up on the 20-year replacement cycle, it’s kind of happening about now so that’s kind of why we’re seeing this schedule.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Okay. Thank you.

MAYOR DISTLER: Any further questions from the Council? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item. I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Kenig and seconded by Councilmember Sandifer to approve the final plans for the 2016 roof replacement projects and authorize staff to proceed with bidding. The motion passed 8-0.] H. MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS 1. RATIFY SEMI-MONTHLY CLAIM FOR MARCH 28, 2016 IN THE AMOUNT OF $1,293,626.28.

MAYOR DISTLER: The next item is Miscellaneous Items. Item Number 1 is to Ratify Semi-monthly Claim for March 28, 2016, in the Amount of $1,293.626.28.

Does anyone on the Council have any questions? Anyone from the audience that would like to speak to this item? I’ll accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Motion to approve.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Sandifer to ratify the semi-monthly claim for March 14, 2016 in the amount of $2,425,890.25. The motion passed 8-0.]

2. MISCELLANEOUS COUNCIL ITEMS.

MAYOR DISTLER: Does anyone on the Council have any item that they would like to discuss? Mr. Pflumm and then Mr. Neighbor and then Mr. Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. I was just kind of hoping everybody had a happy Easter, and we got a little bit of snow, but that was all right, too. So, anyway, hope you had a happy Easter.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Neighbor.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Yeah. I just would -- with the legislature currently in recess, I just would like to thank Assistant City Manager Killen for her timely efforts and information in keeping us informed about what’s going on in Topeka.

MAYOR DISTLER: Mr. Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: I know they’ve already left, but I just wanted to recognize Lucy’s Kids for Peace. So, Lucy Weber and the Weber family live in my neighborhood, Seven Hills Farms. And the bulk of the kids come from my neighborhood. And in the, you know, four years since that group has formed they’ve done amazing work as they attested to and have been involved in hours and hours, hundreds of hours of community service throughout our City. They are a fixture in practically every parade, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, the Old Shawnee Days Parade, and they do a lot of good work. So, anybody who wants to get involved and contribute, or if you have school-aged children who would like to be part of that group let me know, I’ll put you in contact with Jill Chalfie who organizes that group. And they’re always looking for parade walkers as well. So, if any of you that want to tag along I’m sure they’d enjoy that. Thank you.

MAYOR DISTLER: Thank you. Any other items? I. ADJOURNMENT

MAYOR DISTLER: Okay. If there is no other items I will accept a motion to adjourn.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Second.

MAYOR DISTLER: A motion has been made and seconded to adjourn. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

MAYOR DISTLER: Opposed nay. Motion passes. We are adjourned. Thank you.

[Therefore, the motion was made by Councilmember Pflumm and seconded by Councilmember Jenkins to adjourn. The motion passed 8-0.]
(Shawnee City Council Meeting adjourned at 8:36 p.m.)


CERTIFICATE

I certify that the foregoing is a correct transcript from the electronic sound recording of the proceedings in the above-entitled matter.

/das April 6, 2016

Deborah A. Sweeney, Recording Secretary

APPROVED BY:

_______________________

Stephen Powell, City Clerk











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